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---
title: David Stones Poetry Collection Released April 6
tags:
- events
- for-me
date: 2021-03-31T22:56:00-04:00
---
David Stones has played a big part in the CSA in recent years.
On the board of directors, he was instrumental in the CSA putting
together a long-term strategic plan for the organization.
He served as a conference co-organizer and fundraiser, as well as giving
workshops on poetry and research. Three years ago he was the conference
keynote speaker. This month, his second volume of poetry is available
[on Amazon](https://www.amazon.ca/sfumato-Selected-Poems-David-Stones/dp/1989517528/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=david+stones&qid=1617228782&sr=8-1)
April 6.
David has performed his spoken word poems to great acclaim in his resident
city of Stratford Ontario. To Launch his collection on April 6 at a cafe
in Stratford, he will be a Feature Poet as part of the Art Bar Poetry Series.
at 8 pm @ Facebook/Groups/Art Bar Poetry Series.
On Sunday, April 11, the
[Red Lion Reading Series](https://www.facebook.com/events/746753842694447/)
will feature a reading by David at 7:30 – 9:30pm.
---
title: 'Dr. Bob Kroll: Fondly Remembered'
authors:
- Greg O'Grady
tags:
- memories
date: 2021-03-31T11:55:00-04:00
---
Dr. Bob Kroll had a decades-long and impactful career in stuttering treatment,
first at the Clarke Institute in Toronto and then at the Speech and Stuttering
Institute. Whenever he could, he participated in research, conferences and
fund-raisers, to reach out to the stuttering community, provide effective
treatment and ensure that the clinic had funds to help all who needed it. He
will be missed across Canada -- and beyond! Greg O'Grady, like many PWS
throughout the years, found his life changed for the better after attending the
Speech and Stuttering Institute under Bob's leadership. He wrote the following
memorial article about him. The CSA joins him in celebrating the life and work
of Bob Kroll.
---
It is with deep sadness that The Newfoundland and Labrador Stuttering
Association (NLSA) share the passing of Dr. Robert (Bob) Kroll on March 17,
2021. Bob had a distinguished career with the Speech and Stuttering Institute
(SSI) in Toronto as a clinician, Executive Director and Chair of the Board of
Directors. His legacy will be carried on by everyone that have benefited from
his work, mentorship and friendship.
Bob was a mentor and friend of The NLSA. This is sad news for The NLSA. Bob’s
leadership, guidance and support in helping establish The NLSA and his warmth as
a person touched us all. It is an understatement to say that he will be missed
terribly.
As my speech therapist, Dr. Kroll had a significant influence on my life.
Without his influence, The NLSA may never have come to fruition. In a way, Dr.
Robert Kroll is the ‘VOICE’ of The NLSA. His spirit and legacy lives on knowing
that The NLSA is continuing the good work that he started by inspiring The NLSA
to help advocate and support people who stutter, our families and allies in
Newfoundland and Labrador.
Rest in peace our Friend and Thank You.
---
title: Jordanne Erichsen CSA Podcast Interview
tags:
- for-me
date: 2021-04-04T14:49:00-04:00
---
Podcaster Jordanne Erichsen has done another excellent CSA podcast, interviewing
Harvir Thind, a 23 year old Canadian person who stutters.
Having a hard time dealing with his speech growing up, Harvir found acceptance
after connecting with the stuttering community while working for [Camp
SAY](https://www.campsay.org/) (an American camp for children who stutter). He
is now an international ambassador for Projekt Prata, a Swedish based
organization that is raising awareness on stuttering and normalizing it as a way
of speaking.
Connect with the project on [Facebook](https://www.facebook.com/projektprata),
or [projektprata Instagram](https://www.instagram.com/projektprata/), or his
[personal Instagram](Instagram).
---
[Listen to the podcast](https://stutter.ca/mp3/harvir.mp3)
---
*Jordanne Erichsen is a CSA member and Voice Teacher in Montreal,
www.expressvoicestudio.com.*
---
title: Kim Block Writes Poem for Poetry Month
authors:
- Kim Block
tags:
- personal
- for-me
date: 2021-04-01T00:00:00-04:00
---
April is Poetry Month! Kim Block — advocate, writer and PWS — lives in BC with
her husband and two children. She is an author of a children's books series
about a girl who stutters, entitled Stuttering Superhero. See more on [Kim
Block's website](http://www.stutteringadventures.com/author/kim-block/). She
wrote the following poem for the CSA web site to commemorate poetry month.
---
## Human Variation
What it is to be human\
To wake up and feel alive
We process our world through our senses\
But something inside us lies
With so many people around us\
Our world and systems complex
We try to fit concepts, people into boxes\
Trying to define the mess
By carving people into sculptures\
We shave off the rest
To shove aside, oppress and hide\
Similarity is the best?
What a loss we all experience\
When all we want is same
The jewels and shine of humanity\
Float to the ground and become shame
Until the frozen people\
Are so sick and tired of the cold
They break through the harness\
To speak their mind and be bold
We are all variations of humanity\
Beautiful, strong and unique
We are diverse in our human attributes\
We honor each other when we meet
When we meet at the point of connectedness\
When something inside us that lies
The human spirit is boundless\
Variation is what makes us fly
---
title: STAMMA and ISA World Congress 2022
tags:
- events
- for-me
date: 2021-03-31T23:40:00-04:00
---
It has been announced that the STAMMA biennial conference
(known as the Stammafest) and the International Stuttering Association World
Congress will be combined into one event in 2022, to be held
in Liverpool, UK.
It will take place on August 24-28, 2022 at the University of Liverpool.
See the
[STAMMA web site](https://stamma.org/news-features/conference-isa-world-congress-combine)
for more information.
Chair of the Board of Directors at the ISA, Anja Herde, said: _“We are
delighted to have STAMMA as our host for the next ISA World Congress in 2022.
They handed in a really well thought out and comprehensive proposal. We are
sure STAMMA will do a fabulous job and we are very much looking forward to
this fantastic event! Let’s celebrate and deepen our international
collaboration to improve the world for people who stutter!_"
Jane Powell, STAMMA CEO, welcomed the announcement: _“It feels like we are on
the edge of change in the stammering world. With a President of the USA who
stammers and with stammering pride bubbling here, now is a brilliant time to
host this event and collaborate to ensure we get a strong message out,
globally, that stammering is just how some people talk.”
---
title: Stuttering and marriage
tags:
- for-parents
- marriage
- research
date: 2013-10-19T12:45:00-05:00
---
*The Other Side of the Block: The Stutterer’s Spouse. By Julia M. Boberg and
Einer Boberg, from Journal of Fluency Disorders 15 (1990), 61-75*
*The impact of stuttering on adults who stutter and their partners. By Janet M.
Beilby, Michelle L Byrnes, Emily L. Meagher, J. Scott Yaruss, from Journal of
Fluency Disorders 38(2013) 14-29*
In the realm of information about stuttering, many perspectives have been
studied, from that of parents of children who stutter to professionals in the
field. However, there is scant research exploring the effects of stuttering on
the life partner of a person who stutters, and how that relationship is
affected.
In 1990, a study was conducted on this topic through interviews with 15 wives of
men who stuttered. This report was called The Other Side of the Block: The
Stutterer’s Spouse. The wives were asked a series of questions about how they
met their husbands, their first impressions, and the impact of his stuttering on
various aspects of their lives.
## Challenges
Only one wife consulted a speech pathologist before the marriage, to ask how
best to deal with this unique challenge in their relationship. Some problem
areas reported by the wives were introducing their husbands to people, the
restrictions on their social life, everyday tasks that always fell on her such
as answering the phone, ordering in restaurants and asking for things in stores.
Children were also an issue, as some of the men were so afraid their progeny
would inherit the problem that they did not know if they wanted any. A few
insisted on names for the children that they were comfortable saying.
## Wedding Day
One couple deliberately chose a small, informal wedding because the groom did
not feel he could handle the pressures of a large traditional event. One man
blocked severely during his wedding vows, and another had the minister speak in
chorus with him as he made his vows, making fluency easier.
Three of the wives were more confrontational with their husbands and encouraged
them to face their fears, one even recommending that he mention the fact that he
stuttered when meeting new people, preparing them for his disfluncies. But most
of the couples did not discuss the problem. In fact one couple went 20 years
without mentioning it. When the problem was finally brought out into the open
after years of silence, “it brought them closer, and enabled her to share burden
that he had carried alone.”
## Getting Treatment
When the husband took treatment, the wife was usually involved in it. However,
one wife felt left out when he took therapy without her involvement and then
joined a self-help group, not discussing it with her. The exclusion from it
became a problem in their marriage.
All the wives in the study stressed that they were not embarrassed by their
husbands, but said they were often embarrassed for them, because of listener’s
reactions. They didn’t always express their feelings to their husbands for fear
it would make things worse. Five did not think that he was traumatized by his
stuttering, and remained unaware of how he was influenced by it. But many wives
did see their partners as inhibited by stuttering and often found it hard to
express himself, but that they “loved the wonderful person trapped inside”.
Many issues came up in this study. Speech therapy was found to be more effective
when the spouse was involved in it, and being open and talking about the
stuttering problem could strengthen the relationship and made for better
results. But not all of the couples were open with each other about the problem.
Many wives were shocked to learn the extent that the problem dominated their
husbands’ lives outside of the home, at work and in daily activities.
But this research examined the perspective of the non-stuttering partner. how is
this effect different from what the stutterer himself experiences? What are the
differences in how each partner experiences it?
## Annie Glenn
Although there is the familiar list of famous people who stutter, stuttering
spouses are not as well-known. The exception would be Annie Glenn, the wife of
astronaut John Glenn, who was famous in the 1960s when he became the first
American to orbit the earth. The event sparked a media frenzy and much public
attention onto the astronaut’s personal life, including his wife, who all of a
sudden found cameras and microphones pointed at her face. For Annie, who had a
stuttering problem, it was especially trying. She went for treatment at Hollins
Communications Research Institute in Ronoake, Virgina, and in this video her and
her husband describe the changes it made to her speech.
## The other perspective
One thing the 1990 research did not explore is the possible discrepancies
between the fluent spouse’s observations and responses with that of the
stuttering partner. A more recent study, published in 2013, expands on the
issues raised in this previous study. What specific experiences and themes
emerge for both people stuttering? How are their experiences and perceptions
different?
In the more recent study, 10 couples participated in the research. Nine of the
stutterers were men, and one woman. They were all interviewed, and each filled
out questionnaires. The questions asked were more specific, relating to speech
therapy and how the spouse saw her/himself supporting their partner deal with
their stuttering.
Both partners filled out the OASES, a specialized questionnaire developed to
determine the complex effect of stuttering on a person’s life. An alternate
version of the OASES form was developed for the partner of the stutterer,
specifically for this study.
## Acceptance
One theme that arose during the interviews was that of accepting stuttering, and
that “everyone has weaknesses”. Most participants, both the stutterers and
fluent partners, had a good understanding of the realities of speech therapy –
that it does not offer a cure – and described it is a “lifelong journey”. One of
the main benefits of it, in some cases, was increased confidence. “People really
don’t care as much as you do about [stuttering],” said one of the partners who
stuttered, who had chosen not to return to therapy. A man described an expensive
intensive treatment course he had travelled to the states to attend, yet said
“it worked for me for only a short time.”
One wife, found watching her husband’s first therapy session “distressing.” It
was only then that she saw how hard he struggled with it and the hard work that
would be involved in controlling it. When their son began stuttering, it was her
“worst fears come to life”.
## Patience
A couple of fluent partners admitted to being frustrated sometimes when their
husbands stuttered, but also had admiration for them because of what they have
gone through and continued to face everyday. They acknowledged that it had been
a problem professionally and socially. “He lives a sheltered life” one wife said
of her spouse, “and doesn’t interact much.” Like in the 1990 study, many wives
found social gatherings difficult, as they were conscious of how uncomfortable
their spouse was. Likewise there was a theme of admiration for the stuttering
partner.
All the fluent partners said they were not familiar with other people who
stuttered until they met their future spouse, other than one or two classmates
from grade school. The only fluent male partner in the study admitted during the
interview to having once teased a classmate who stuttered.
## Openness
As opposed to the earlier study, a greater percentage of the fluent partners saw
the importance of talking about the problem, and not to let it fester and
resentment to build up. In 1990, most of the wives respected what they saw as
their husband’s desire to not speak about it.
## Responsibility
More than half of the fluent partners found they had to make up for their
spouses’ fears of communicating, such as his reluctance to use the phone. One
wife thought sometimes it seemed like she “had to carry everything” and
encouraged her husband “to do something” about his stuttering. Four of the ten
fluent partners felt protective of their stuttering spouse in social situations,
and stood up for him when it was necessary.
The majority of fluent partners definitely felt that the stuttering problem was
a “shared experience.”
## OASES Questionnaire
In almost every area, the stuttering and fluent partners had similar
observations and feelings about how stuttering effected their lives and
relationships. There was one major discrepancy, however, in the answers to the
OASES questionnaire. The OASES study is a questionnaire to guage the full impact
of stuttering on the life of a person who stutters. It documents multiple
outcomes in stuttering treatment, and collects information about the totality of
the stuttering disorder, including: (a) general perspectives about stuttering,
(b) affective, behavioral, and cognitive reactions to stuttering, (c) functional
communication difficulties, and (d) impact of stuttering on the speaker’s
quality of life.
For most of these categories, there was little statistical difference in how the
fluent partner viewed the issue compared to the PWS. But in the last section,
the overall impact of stuttering on quality of life, the fluent spouse
underestimated the effects of the problem, indicating that the spouse “may not
be fully aware of the true extent of the adverse impact that stuttering may
have”. This was similar to the first 1990 study where a number of the wives were
not clear on extent of their husbands’ stuttering outside of the family context,
such as at work.
## Conclusions
Like the first study, this research showed that the spouse should be included in
therapy, have knowledge of stuttering and full acceptance of the stuttering
partner. Full treatment histories of stutterers should be explored before or
during the treatment.
......@@ -3,6 +3,7 @@ title: Donate
menu: main
weight: 8
draft: false
pagesList: false
---
> **Every dollar raised goes directly to supporting People Who Stutter (PWS),
......
......@@ -47,6 +47,10 @@ highlighted:
style:
background: info
text: white
# Recent articles
articleTags:
- for-me
---
**Our goal is to empower you to own your stutter!**
......
......@@ -51,6 +51,10 @@ highlighted:
style:
background: success
text: white
# Recent articles
articleTags:
- for-parents
---
Being a parent is hard, and we want to help support
......
......@@ -61,7 +61,13 @@
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......@@ -7,6 +7,17 @@
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......@@ -8,7 +8,7 @@
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......@@ -18,6 +18,18 @@
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......@@ -8,7 +8,7 @@
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......@@ -18,6 +18,18 @@
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......
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